Main Menu
· Home
· Calendar
· Photos
· Forms

· Search this site
· Links/Recommendations
· Answers to FAQ
· Services
· Upcoming Events
· Products
· Sound Advice
· Health/Fitness
· All About Us






 

Welcome to the Daviess County Health Department!


Public health makes life better. We provide a wide variety of services, from home health visits to health issue counseling, from Immunization Clinics to Blood Pressure and Blood Sugar Screenings, from WIC Clinics to Well Baby Clinics -- and other services that may surprise you, such as restaurant inspections, bioterrorism and emergency planning, well water testing, on-site sewer appraisals and permitting, and communicable disease investigation and more.


Disclaimer and Nondiscrimination Statement


All information contained within the Daviess County Health Department's website is intended for educational purposes only and is not to be used for diagnosis or treatment. The information is provided to further the understanding of WIC nutrition and related matters. Consumers should never disregard medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something they may have seen on this site. Nutritionists, physicians and other health care professionals are encouraged to consult other sources and confirm information contained on this site. References to any non-governmental entity, product, service, or source of information that may be contained in this site should not be considered an endorsement, either direct or implied, by the Daviess County Health Department. Additionally, the Daviess County Health Department cannot be held responsible for information contained on other sites to which its website may be linked. If any offensive information is found on these sites, we would appreciate immediate notification. In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Agriculture policy, this institution is prohibited from Discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability.

Cholesterol Screenings OfferedTopic: Health/Fitness
Daviess County Health Department is offering Cholesterol Screenings in September 2015.

September is National Cholesterol Awareness Month. The Daviess County Health Department is offering a Lipid Panel for $10.00 on the following dates in September from 8am to 1pm. Tuesday, September 1st. Tuesday September 8th, Tuesday September 15th, and Tuesday September 22nd 2015 .This is a fasting test and you must not eat or drink after midnight the night prior to the tests. Because this is a screening, you will not need to obtain a doctors order or call for an appointment. You must be 18yrs old or older, walk in on the above dates between 8am and 1pm and be fasting. Your results will be mailed to you on the next day.
The cholesterol screening (lipid panel) includes the following; Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDL, HDL, and Cardiac Risk Ratio. The regular price for a lipid panel is $110.00 our cost to you is $10.00. High blood cholesterol is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death in the United States. Lowering cholesterol levels reduces the risk of heart disease death among persons either with or without coronary heart disease.


What is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a waxy substance found in all body cells. Our bodies use cholesterol to digest food, make hormones, build cell walls, and perform other important functions.

Where Does Cholesterol Come From?

Our bodies make cholesterol in the liver. Dietary cholesterol comes only from animal products such as meat, dairy, eggs, and animal fats.
If blood cholesterol is too high, we can have health problems such as narrowing or blocking of blood vessels, heart disease and strokes.

Measuring Blood Cholesterol

o 200 or less is desirable. If your level is less than 200, ask your healthcare provider when you should have it rechecked.
o 200-239 means you are at moderate risk for heart disease and stroke, especially if you have other risk factors such as obesity or high blood pressure, if you are a smoker, or if you have family history of heart disease.
o 240+ means you are at high risk for developing heart disease. Ask your healthcare provider what you can do to lower your cholesterol.

LDL and HDL (parts of total cholesterol)

Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)

LDL cholesterol is deposited on artery walls. They cause a waxy buildup called plaque. It is known as “bad cholesterol”.

Optimal LDL levels are less than 100 mg/dl or lower if you have heart disease or diabetes or other risk factors (such as family history of heart disease, or if you smoke).
Optimal LDL levels are less than 130 mg/dl if you have no risk factors for heart disease.

How Can I Lower My LDL Level?

o Lose weight if you are overweight.
o Reduce saturated fat found in dairy products, cheese and meat.
o Reduce hydrogenated fats (trans fats) found in French fries, snack crackers, cookies, baking mixes, shortening, butter and stick margarine.
o Use monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats such as canola, olive, safflower and sunflower oils when cooking.

High Density Lipoprotein (HDL)

HDL takes extra cholesterol out of the body and is called “good cholesterol”.

Desirable HDL levels are greater than 40 mg/dl.
Optimal levels are greater than 60 mg/dl.
A level of 60 or more is considered protective against heart disease.
To Raise Your HDL Level

o Lose weight if you are overweight.
o Exercise regularly (consult with your healthcare provider before beginning any exercise program).
o Don’t smoke.
o Replace saturated fat with unsaturated fats.


What About Triglycerides?

Triglycerides are a fat that the body makes from alcohol, sugar, or excess calories. High triglyceride levels may add to buildup of plaque in the blood vessels (atherosclerosis). High triglycerides are a risk factor for heart disease.

o Less than 150 is a normal triglyceride level.
o 150-199 is considered borderline high.
o 200-499 is considered high.
o 500 or more is considered very high.

Decreasing Your Triglycerides

o Lose weight if you are overweight.
o Get regular physical activity (consult with your healthcare provider before beginning any exercise program).
o Decrease or avoid alcohol.
o Decrease sugar-containing foods.


The DCHD staff feels it’s important to educate our public and offer these special screenings as much as possible to help our community be more informed because prevention and education is the key to good health. If you are interested or have questions please feel free to call the health dept. at 660-663-2414.


Published Aug 17, 2015 - 12:00 AM Printer friendly page


Send Your Kids Back To School With Their Vaccines Up To Date Topic: Health/Fitness

Back-to-school season is here. Time for parents to gather school supplies and back packs. It’s also the perfect time to make sure your kids are up-to-date on their vaccines.
Getting children all of the vaccines recommended by CDC’s immunization schedule is one of the most important things parents can do to protect their children’s health—and that of classmates and the community. Most schools require children to be current on vaccinations before enrolling to protect the health of all students. Be sure and supply your school an updated and current Immunization record, otherwise your child can be withheld from school.
Today’s childhood vaccines protect against serious and potentially life-threatening diseases, including polio, measles, whooping cough, and chickenpox.
“Thanks to vaccines, most of these diseases have become rare in the United States,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “But many still exist here, and they can make children very sick, leading to many days of missed school, missed work for parents, and even hospitalization and death.”
When children are not vaccinated, they are at increased risk of disease and can spread diseases to others in their classrooms and community—including babies who are too young to be fully vaccinated, and people with weakened immune systems due to cancer and other health conditions.
School age children need vaccines. For example, kids who are 4 to 6 years old are due for boosters of four combinations of vaccines: DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis), chickenpox, MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella), and polio. Older children, like pre-teens and teens, need Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), HPV (human papillomavirus), and MCV (meningococcal conjugate virus) vaccines. In addition, yearly flu vaccines are recommended for all children 6 months and older.
Check with your child’s doctor or Daviess County Health Department to find out what vaccines they may need this year.
Daviess County Health Department (DCHD) is a provider of Vaccines for Children (VFC). VFC is a program that provides free vaccine to children ages 0 thru 18 years of age that are Uninsured , Medicaid, Underinsured or Alaskan Native/American Indian/Asian or Pacific Islander. DCHD also has private purchased vaccine and is contracted with five major insurance providers. Coventry, Blue Cross Blue Shield of KC, Cigna, United Health Care, and AETNA. If you have one of these five insurance providers and want to get your Immunizations at the Daviess County Health Department, we advise you call your insurance prior to your visit and make sure your insurance covers Immunizations for you or your child. If your insurance does not cover immunizations we can offer VFC vaccines up to 19 yrs old, and limited adult vaccines for 19 yrs. old and older.
DCHD has Public health day every Tuesday from 8 am to 4pm and are available on those days to do Immunizations with no appointment needed. If Tuesday will not work for you call and we will try to set up an appointment on another day. We ask not to wait until the very last minute! Once school begins we are out of the office and all over the county doing school screenings, so don’t wait, do it as soon as possible.
Reminder!!! We have one more day and appointments still available for Sports Physicals on August 13th 8:30am to 11:30am must call for appointment! Questions for DCHD call 660-663-2414
Parents can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents
Parents can also find the newest MSHSAA physical form at http;//www.mshsaa.org/sports med

Published Jul 29, 2015 - 12:00 AM Printer friendly page


Sports Physicals Available Topic: Upcoming Events
Daviess County Health Department is offering Sports Physicals by appointment 4 different dates throughout the summer. Dawn Estes, FNP will be the provider doing the physicals. The cost of the physicals is $15.00 cash or check and a parent must be present. The sports physical forms can be downloaded at http://www.mshsaa.org/SportsMedicine/ and be sure you print the most recent form which is dated 03/03/2014. Nurses will be available for immunizations so please bring your immunization card and insurance information. The health department can bill limited insurance which is Medicaid, BC/BS, Coventry/Aetna, Cigna, United Healthcare/UMR. If you would like to make an appointment or you have any questions please call 660-663-2414.
Published May 27, 2015 - 12:58 PM Printer friendly page


ATV Safety EventTopic: Upcoming Events
The Daviess County Health Department will be partnering with The ATV Institute for an ATV safety event on June 6, 2015. The event is being held at the Gallatin High School and available by appointment only. Participants can try their hand at operating an ATV through The ATV safety Institute Introductory Experience. This program is geared towards persons with little or no off-road vehicle experience and a great way to see what the sport is all about. The event is offered to children ages 10-18 and will be conducted by certified instructors. Protective gear and ATV's will be provided. Participants are asked to wear long pants and over the ankle boots and must have a parent or guardian present. You will need to call the health department to sign up as space is limited. Our number is 660-663-2414 and we are open 8-4:30 M-F. Every child who attends this event will get a voucher to go to Rob's Cycle to be fitted for a FREE helmet, YES FREE!! The Daviess County Health Department is partnering with The ATV Institute, Rob's Cycle and MODot Blueprint for Safety to bring you this event.
Published May 26, 2015 - 12:00 AM Printer friendly page


Celebrating 40 yearsTopic: All About Us


The Daviess County Health Department is celebrating 40 years! The health department was founded in 1975 by Mary Wheeler, RN through a grant but that grant soon ran out and Mrs. Wheeler campaigned for a mill tax. The community was very supportive and soon the tax passed and the health department was able to expand services. We plan to celebrate 40 years of service by "GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY". April 6-10, 2015 is National Public Health Week and we are planning several events to help us celebrate both activities. April 6th and 8th we will do our annual health fair and offer free labs to Daviess County residents. Those out of county will still be able to get a very good rate of $40.00 for women and $50.00 for men; we will start taking appointments for the labs on March 20, 2015 at 8AM. We will also have several local vendors available that day to offer many resources in our immediate area. On Tuesday April 9th we will offer our usual walk in public health day.
On Thursday we plan to do a lunch time healthy walk on the square and if you do the walk we will put your name in our Friday drawing for a prize. You can put your name in our drawings every day if you do something at the health department whether it be a BP, lab draw, or some other service we offer. On Friday we are planning a BBQ lunch for our community; weather permitting you can come and sit for a meal or take a sack lunch with you. All names will be drawn for prizes on Friday April 10th.

Watch the Gallatin paper for an article written by Tammy Huffman about the history of the health  department and where we are now. We will also be advertising in all surrounding papers for our 40th anniversary/public health fair week activities.


Published Feb 24, 2015 - 01:05 PMcomments? Printer friendly page


WIC: Sherri Carder recieves WIC AwardTopic: All About Us
2014 Brought 40 years of WIC History!

Sherri Carder, Kristie Smith, and Jessica Nelson of the Daviess County Health Department attended the WIC Conference held in Columbia Mo. The theme was 40 years of WIC! Making a difference! During the banquet Sherri Carder was presented with a certificate for 33 years of dedication and commitment to the health and wellness of Women, Infants and Children in the state of Missouri outstanding achievement.

The special supplemental nutrition program for Women, Infants and Children is a federally funded discretionary program. Funding is allocated each fiscal year by Congress through the appropriations process. Funding levels are determined, then the Food and nutrition service (FNS) of USDA distributes grants to the 90 WIC state Agencies, including the U.S. Territories and Indian Tribal Organizations
The year of 2014 was a celebration of Forty Years of W.I.C.
Some W.I.C. history:
• 1972 WIC was piloted as a supplemental food program aimed at improving the health of pregnant mothers, infants and children in response to growing concern over malnutrition among many poverty-stricken mothers and young children.
• 1974 The first WIC site opened in Kentucky in January.
• 1974 WIC operating in 45 states.
• 1975 WIC was established as a permanent program by legislation P.L.94-105
• 1975 Eligibility was extended to non-breastfeeding women (up to 6 months postpartum) and children up to age 5. WIC initially provided supplemental foods to children up to age 4 and to breast-feeding postpartum mothers. The supplement foods should contain nutrients found lacking in target populations, and have relatively low levels of fat, sugar and salt. Sates needed to coordinate referrals to social services including immunizations, alcohol and drug abuse prevention, child abuse counseling, and family planning.
• 1992 WIC introduced and enhanced food package for exclusively breastfeeding mother to further promote breastfeeding. These items were carrots, tuna, extra milk and cheese.
• 1997 USDA implemented Loving Support Makes Breastfeeding Work campaign to increase breastfeeding rates among WIC mothers and improve public support of breastfeeding.
• 2004 The Breastfeeding Peer Counselor initiative was launched: Women with breastfeeding experience and training (often past WIC participants) became counselors to support other women learning to breastfeed.
• 2009 Based on Institute of Medicine recommendations, USDA introduced a new food package with foods consistent with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and established dietary recommendations for infants and children over two years of age. Fruits, vegetables, and culturally sensitive substitutes for WIC foods are now part of the WIC food package. In addition, mothers who exclusively breastfeed receive more healthy foods with the enhanced WIC food package for exclusively breastfeeding.

In the beginning vouchers were a sheet of 8x11with three carbon copies and amount of foods were hand written. In the Mid 80’s they were issued by computer still 8x11 two carbons, and then in the 90’s an upgrade to check sized paper printed by the computers one thickness information stored in computer, by 2017 WIC will convert to an EBT card system.
The first two agencies in Missouri were Kirksville, Adair County and Rolla, Phelps County in 1974. Daviess County WIC program started in1976 With Mary Wheeler Administrator, and Delores Gatton as clerk caseload of approximately 20 to 40. At present, WIC Coord .and WIC certifier Sherri Carder, Nutrition Coord. and RD. Ryan Rosier, Breastfeeding, and Peer counselor Coord., CPA Kristie Smith , Cheryl Alexander CPA, Jackie Nichols, and Janet McMahon WIC Certifiers ,and Breastfeeding Peer Counselors Jessica Nelson and Angela Wayne, caseload of 210.
Do you remember in 1974?
• 1 can of formula $1.12 Today $16.00
• Bananas 12 cents a lb. Today 59cents
• 1 gallon milk $1.54 Today $4.89
A lot of change has taken place over 40th years and still more to come. If you would like more information about the WIC program and how to apply please contact the Daviess County Health Department at 660.663.2414. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.







Published Dec 30, 2014 - 12:00 AM Printer friendly page


Enterovirus Affecting ChildrenTopic: Health/Fitness
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 11, 2014
Increase in Respiratory Illness Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68): What you need to know
In response to increasing numbers of respiratory illness (Enterovirus D68), the Daviess County Health Department wants you to know the facts so you can protect your family.
Enterovirus is a common virus. With more than 100 types of enteroviruses, an estimated 10 to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. Most people who are infected with enteroviruses have no or mild symptoms. However some enteroviruses, like Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), can be very serious.
Symptoms of the Enterovirus D68 are similar to the common cold. Severe symptoms are possible with EV-D68, such as difficulty breathing. Children with cold like symptoms that experience difficulty breathing should consult their family physician.
Enterovirus D68 appears to be spreading by close contact with infected people. There is no vaccine or antiviral medication to treat EV-D68.
The Daviess County Health Department provides the following recommendations to prevent the spread of EV-D68 and to also protect yourself and your family:
• Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after using the restroom or changing diapers. The use of soap and water is very important to combat EV-D68. Soap and water are the preferred method of hand washing.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.
• Disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick
• If you are sick, stay home.
Your Local Public Health Department continues to monitor the situation and share information with local health providers. While there are reports of increased cases across several Midwest states, there is not a surveillance system that can account for exact numbers of infections.
Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, Senior Epidemiology Specialist C. Jon Hinkle says, “Using good hand hygiene, practicing good cough and sneeze etiquette and staying home if you are sick are the most effective tools to fight EV-D68.”
For more information on EV-D68 visit http://www.cdc.gov/non-polio-enterovirus/about/EV-D68.html or contact the Daviess County Health Department at 660-663-2414.
###

Published Sep 11, 2014 - 12:00 AM Printer friendly page

Poll
 
Do you use a seat belt every time you get in your car?
Yes
No
[ Results | Polls ]
Votes: 23
Comments: 0
 
Calendar
 
Today
No Events

Upcoming Events

Tue, Sep. 1, 2015
Wed, Sep. 2, 2015
Tue, Sep. 8, 2015
Wed, Sep. 9, 2015
Thu, Sep. 10, 2015
Mon, Sep. 14, 2015

[ Search ]

 
User's Login
 
 Username
 Password
 Remember me


Don't have an account yet? You can create one. As a registered user you have some advantages like a theme manager, comments configuration and posting comments with your name.
 
Past Articles
 
Friday, March 28
·A Healthy Heart: The Numbers to Know (0)
Wednesday, February 27
·Kids Have A New Fun food Destination (0)
Thursday, January 17
·Auttism Cases Still Going Up As Vaccine Mercury Removed (0)
Monday, January 14
·Are you Allergic to Cleaning? (0)
·Extreme Cold (0)
 Older Articles